Program
Program
Arts & Humanities
About

Uniting art and community to transform conflicts through original theatrical works, collective creativity, and leadership development for underserved populations. 

Intersection’s Arts & Humanities program employs a unique approach to social justice initiatives. Using a combination of education and artistic expression to frame social issues and establish common ground, we engage and empower those whom we are honored and committed to serve, helping people discover their personal role in creating justice in the world. More

Multimedia

Fred Johnson interviews Queens rapper and poet Ha Style, featured artist performing at Soundtrack of War on June 4 at the Queens Museum!

blog
Thu, 18 May 2017
blogWhen Companies You Love Do Bad Things

I find myself running out of airlines to choose from. Recent news reports of passenger mistreatment leave me disappointed in these companies for their policies and/or personnel, and I remember these feelings when I travel, which is fairly frequently. If I am to maintain a stance of solidarity with the grossly mistreated, my options are... more...

blog
Thu, 6 Apr 2017
blogMy Workplace is Sacred

I often refer to Studio 145, the performing space housed at Intersections International, as a sacred space. Its prestige is tied to religion, but not one particular religion. It’s a space where reverence is expected for all people, with respect for their spiritual beliefs. I believe that universal kind of reverence is foundational... more...

blog
Mon, 27 Feb 2017
blogWhen I Took On a Role Originated for a White Man

Last year, I began playing the role of Sam Simon in the one-man (and two musician) play The Actual Dance, the story of a married couple’s navigation of the wife's breast cancer diagnosis, told through the husband’s perspective. The anxiety and anticipation of potentially losing her is compared to waiting in a ballroom to... more...

blog
Fri, 20 Jan 2017
blogAm I Willing to Die For Justice?

I’ve probably heard it a thousand times now, Martin Luther King’s “Mountaintop” speech. He gave the speech in Memphis, TN the night before his assassination. It’s haunting.  Especially the end where he specifically talks about having “been to the mountaintop.”  And then it’s... more...